The King’s Speech – Film Review

Sometimes the simplest films are considered the best film based on the performance an actor or two give, and in the case of The King’s Speech, that is precisely what I concluded after much consideration and contemplation.

The King’s Speech, is the story of King George VI of Britain’s (Colin Firth) ascension to the thrown after the abdication of his older brother, King Edward VIII in 1936. Although he was worthy of the thrown and most of Britain admired King George VI, his inability to give a speech  effectively as a result of a stammer, led his queen (Helena Bonham Carter) to find an ideal speech therapist to assist in treating the “ailment.”

With a possible threat of yet another World War lurking in the minds of the Parliament, while trying to ensure the Monarchy remained reputable after King Edward VIII’s abdication, King George begins to rely heavily on the speech therapist, Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush) to pull him through one of the most important and difficult speeches a King must give to his people – The confidence to have faith in their King and government and to stand by them while they declare war on Germany and Hitler.

Period films, in my opinion, are very difficult to follow and seldom successful with audiences, but The King’s Speech, as I stated before has received it’s high praise, recognition and Golden Globe nomination because of the performances of Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush. The two fine actors were perfectly cast for the roles and have done an outstanding job portraying their respective characters.

I highly recommend the film, it is truly an inspiration piece of work. I also hope that both actors win the award for Best Actor in Motion Picture Drama – Colin Firth and Best Supporting Actor in Motion Picture Drama – Geoffrey Rush.

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